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Benchmark meeting on groundwater governance marks road to World Water Day and UN International Year of Water Cooperation

The Hague (NL), 19–21 March 2013UNESCO, together with FAO, World Bank, IAH and UNECE, will organize a Regional Consultation on Groundwater Governance at the outset of the activities celebrating World Water Day 2013 and in the framework of the UN International Year of Water Cooperation. Organized under the responsibility of the UNESCO-IHP, this consultation focuses on the characteristics of groundwater use in North America, Europe and Central Asia (including all EECCA countries) and seeks to promote the discussion about the specific challenges and priorities within the regional context.

 
AGU 2012 fall meeting: scientists perspectives on climate change

This is not cool. During the Fall Meeting of AGU, 3–7 December 2012 in San Francisco, videographer Peter Sinclair captured the views of eight scientists representing some of USA’s leading research institutions in a video produced for The Yale Forum.

 
Launch at UNESCO of the International Year for Water Cooperation 2013

11 February 2013, Paris • The International Year for Water Cooperation will be launched at UNESCO Headquarters on 11 February 2013. The importance of cooperation in managing water resources in a world where demand is rapidly growing cannot be underestimated: about 145 countries share a major river basin with at least one other nation. Contrary to widely held belief cooperation is more frequent than confrontation over water.

 
Greater Mekong Atlas of the Environment

The Greater Mekong Subregion is one of the most dynamic regions in the world, witnessing rapid economic growth over the past two decades. Much of this has been fueled by the unsustainable use of its natural resources. While this has led to increased prosperity, it has also created immense pressure on the natural environment, including its rich and unique biodiversity. The Asian Development Bank has produced the Greater Mekong Subregion Atlas of the Environment.

 
Green growth and alternative water allocation mechanisms

The need to reform water allocation, policies and mechanisms is becoming more and more pertinent to the policy-making agenda. Increasing demand for energy, competition over water, climate change and over-allocation of water have compelled governments to address this issue. Governments have different points of departure, however. During a two-day workshop on Water Allocation and Green Growth, 22–23 November 2012 in Wageningen, the Netherlands, almost 50 participants underlined the importance of raising awareness that water allocations are going to be reduced and to approach it in an organized way.

 
Securing water and land in the Tana Basin, Kenya: a resource book for water managers and practitioners

A new manual describes Kenya’s Tana River catchment area and zooms in on what can practically be done in the different parts of the basin to secure land and water. With 800–1,000 km length the Tana River is Kenya’s largest river. A large range of measures can be introduced: bench terraces and tied ridges in the Upper Catchment; retention through sand dams and subsurface dams in the Middle Catchment; flood water management in the Lower Tana; improved agroforestry throughout the area. Much remains to be done – in outscaling successful experiences and introducing new techniques to better secure ecosystems and make use of water buffers.

 
Institutional adaptive capacity as a way towards water security? The case of Kyrgyzstan

Water takes on special importance in Kyrgyzstan. Also known as the «Switzerland of Central Asia», this mountainous country at the very heart of Asia is home to a complex system of rivers, lakes and glaciers, and produces an average volume of water of 2,458 km3, or the 30% of the total water resources of the region. Financial constraints, political volatility, fragentation, and the perceptions are the four barriers to adaptive capacity. An informative poster by Beatrice Mosello.

 
Impact of sea level rise on groundwater flow regimes: A sensitivity analysis for the Netherlands

In this thesis (1996), G.H.P. Oude Essink investigates the possible impact of sea-level rise and human activities on vulnerable coastal groundwater flow regimes in the Netherlands for the next millennium. The focus is on the distribution of fresh and saline groundwater, the volumes of freshwater lenses in the dunes and the seepage and salt load to polders. Since groundwater flow is a slow process, the consequences for the next thousand years are considered.

 
UNESCO-IHE Education and Training Guide 2013

The UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education in Delft, the Netherlands, offers a range of educational solutions for water professionals that wish to increase their professional expertise or refresh their knowledge and skills for today’s working environment

 
Streamflow Depletion by Wells—Understanding and Managing the Effects of Groundwater Pumping on Streamflow

Groundwater is an important source of water for many human needs, including public supply, agriculture, and industry. With the development of any natural resource, however, adverse consequences may be associated with its use. One of the primary concerns related to the development of groundwater resources is the effect of groundwater pumping on streamflow. An new USGS report summarizes the scientific insights.

 
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